The EPA Is Killing Bees
When the calendar flipped from 2006 to 2007, beekeepers peeked into their hives and noticed something frightening: Their bees had disappeared.

There was no evidence of mass deaths, and the hives were left intact, but all of a sudden their honeybees were simply gone. The queen was still there, as were her young brood, but all of the worker bees simply didn’t come into work that day. And when that happens in a beehive, the complex machinations at work break down. Without any workers, there is no hive. The Environmental Protection Agency, sensing an epidemic that needed to be addressed, dubbed the issue Colony Collapse Disorder.

Since, the disappearance of bees has continued. Experts suggest many beekeepers lose upwards of 50% of their hives due to this mysterious exodus. And while the problem doesn’t seem to have gotten any worse over the years, it certainly hasn’t gotten better and is still considered one of the biggest environmental problems currently plaguing our planet today.

The EPA Is Killing Bees

When the calendar flipped from 2006 to 2007, beekeepers peeked into their hives and noticed something frightening: Their bees had disappeared.

There was no evidence of mass deaths, and the hives were left intact, but all of a sudden their honeybees were simply gone. The queen was still there, as were her young brood, but all of the worker bees simply didn’t come into work that day. And when that happens in a beehive, the complex machinations at work break down. Without any workers, there is no hive. The Environmental Protection Agency, sensing an epidemic that needed to be addressed, dubbed the issue Colony Collapse Disorder.

Since, the disappearance of bees has continued. Experts suggest many beekeepers lose upwards of 50% of their hives due to this mysterious exodus. And while the problem doesn’t seem to have gotten any worse over the years, it certainly hasn’t gotten better and is still considered one of the biggest environmental problems currently plaguing our planet today.